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How to Write A Novel Using the Snowflake Method 10 Step in 10 Days Series | Step One

Updated: Sep 22



I wrote the second draft of my cozy mystery series using Randy Ingermanson Snowflake Method, after feeling discouraged with my first draft. I wrote by the seat of my pant with no formal outline or direction to navigate the characters through their story; they were just as lost as I was. But after using the Snowflake Method, during the second draft I found writing less stressful, I knew my characters, my settings, and had a full-blown novel implementing the 10 steps of his book.


The next 10 days I’m going to share with you, one step at a time of the Snowflake Method on my blog and add the live stream video and chat. You can follow along and implement each step during your writing process. Remember, you may not need to use all 10 steps, and this method may not work for you, but I guarantee there are bits and pieces of the Snowflake Method that will help you with your draft, even if it's developing the scope of your characters, or catching open plot holes.


The beauty of our writing journey is trying new things and discovering what works for you as a writer.


What Genre You Writing?


First thing first is to know the category of your book. What genre you’re writing. Imagine if you were to go to a bookstore, where would I find your book? What kind of book are you writing?


Who's Your Target Audience?


Second, know your target audience. Who are you writing for? Pick two or three people you are writing for. Don’t just think of their demographics, but include their psychographics; combined helps you determine your target audience.


Demographics are their age, gender, ethnic background, marital status…
Psychographics includes their likes, dislikes, beliefs, values, attitude, lifestyle…

Step One: Snowflake Method


Write One-Sentence Summary of your story using 25 words or less.


* Include one or two major characters that will tie together the big picture of your story. Who has the most to lose and what they hope to accomplish?


The purpose of Step One


It’s easy to memorize 25 words or less, to share with people who asked what’s your story’s about. You can also use this step as a marketing tool to help determine who’s your target audience. Either someone would want to know more about your story or they will change the subject.


Happy Writing~




 

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©2020 by Tish Bouvier | Author Haiku Poet